5 Fun Things To Do In Chattanooga, TN

Guys, Chattanooga is awesome. Casey and I have both been to Chattanooga, but mostly times when we were just passing through for an evening. So we finally went for a weekend and it was lovely! My mom flew in from Texas and we three had a pretty adventurous 2 days there. Chattanooga is a place I never knew I'd love so much, but we just couldn't stop talking about it when we left. It is a perfect weekend trip from Nashville or Atlanta (and many more places I'm sure), and now we want to tell you why you should spend some time there too!

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We recorded a vlog while we were there of all of our adventures! You can see more details about the places we were in this footage.

First of all, let's talk about this Airbnb. This is where we stayed for our weekend in Chattanooga.

The space was insanely spacious and had a full kitchen, which we love to have when traveling! Plus there was a gas fireplace which was nice in the evenings as is was still a little cooler (as it was Spring.... yes this blog has taken a very long time to write).

If you are interested in using Airbnb for the first time, you can CLICK HERE to get 15% off your first booking!
Okay and onto the things we loved in Chattanooga that you should definitely check out!

1. The Pedestrian Bridge / If you are from Nashville you may think "why would I want to go here?" Because yes we do have one here in Nashville. But this one is different. It's one of the longest pedestrian bridges in the world and the view is especially beautiful for sunset. One end is downtown and one is The North Shore, which we will talk about later.

2. Sunset Rock / Okay so I don't think pictures do this place justice... It's a short walk from the parking lot, although you'll want to wear closed toe shoes as it's a very rocky walk down a bunch of stairs.

You drive up for a while, following directions from your phone or GPS....

And then park at the tiny lot across from this cute house. The parking lot only has 7 or 8 spots so that is something to keep in mind! We were lucky and snagged a spot right before sunset. I know there's another way to get to the rock because people were coming off a different trail than we were on, so if the parking lot is full, you have options. I just don't know those exact details! It's silent up there, except for whoever may be up there with you. But it's serene and beautiful at sunset.

3. Foster Falls / Okay this hike is kind of insane at first. I guess it depends on which way you start the loop, but the first part we did went straight down on rocks the whole time until you reach the waterfall. If you go to the waterfall overlook and head to your left, that's the route we took.

But if you aren't into hiking, you can just go to the overlook and see the falls from afar. It is far away... But if you are into doing the hike, it's really cool to see the waterfall up close and then keep walking and see all the rock climbers along the rest of the hike. There were so many of them! And we are not rock climbers, so it was really cool to watch. The hike is rocky the whole way through, so make sure you are prepared!

4. Denny Cove / So you have to hike to see this waterfall, but I think I liked this one more. The hike was harder, by far. Sometimes you don't even understand where the trail is because there are so many fallen rocks. But I don't think we saw a single soul on this trail, so at the end we had the waterfall all to ourselves.

5. The North Shore / Okay I sort of mentioned this earlier, but at one end of the Pedestrian bridge you will find The North Shore. Here, there are a ton of local shops and restaurants in one small area. It's a great place to park and walk around. We went to a lot of the shops (went 2 different times) and drank bubble tea after our walk. It is so interesting what you can learn about a place when you visit it's local shops. Even if you aren't in the market to make purchases, it's still a cool way to see a town!

Though our trip was short, we managed to squeeze in a lot of adventures and good food. It ended too fast, but I know one thing- we need to go back to explore more. These 5 things are just the baseline of things to do in Chattanooga!


How To Float The Harpeth River In Nashville (FREE)

Every summer we have a list of things that we love to do for the maximum Nashville summer experience. One of those things is floating down the Harpeth River. Something we have realized this year is that people do now know about this really fun (and free) option! Both times we've been this year we haven't seen anyone else in floats, only people in canoes or kayaks. And every time we hear that they didn't know floating was an option. Well guys, we are here today to tell you how to do the float, where to go, what to bring, and how to figure out if it's a good time to go.

First off, you are going to need a tube. (Side note, before I moved to Nashville, I had always called this activity "tubing".) And you don't want a rinky dink tube that's going to pop if it touches rock. You are going to want a pretty hefty tube. We have gone through a couple different tubes over the years, but the ones we have now are on their third year, and they were $5 at Walmart.

Now, grabbing a tube at Walmart is a great option, if they have the right thing. And I'll add that the tubes were on sale for $5, that wasn't the original price. But if they don't have what you need/want, there are plenty of great options on Amazon. As you can see in the photo above, people use all kinds of floats, but the main rule of thumb is that it needs to be a thicker tube- it may even say it's for the river. Other options that you can choose from are 1- tubes that have a bottom (or don't), 2- tubes that can connect to other tubes (a.k.a. they have little latches attached to your float by strings that click into other people's latches if they have them) and 3- a head rest or no head rest.
These are all personal preference, but our tubes are open at the bottom and have latches to connect to other tubes and no head rests. Don't get caught up on what kind of tube you get. Just get one that isn't going to pop and you will be happy on the water!

And then you'll want to get a waterproof bag to keep things like cell phones, snacks, and keys in. We always keep our phones in waterproof cases and then keep those around our necks or in the waterproof bag. I would not recommend just putting them freely in a waterproof bag unless your phone is waterproof and you don't plan on opening the bag during the float. You definitely don't want to drop your phone in the river! Or just leave your phone in the car! Just play it safe.

And one more thing! Water shoes are recommended. The bottom of the river is rocky, and it just makes it easier if you have something on your feet. We use tevas, but any water shoe will do.
Now let's talk about how you are going to get there and what you do when you do. First of all, you have to figure out how long you want to float. There are 3 main different floats I'm going to tell you about. The one we always do starts in this parking lot in the photo above. This is the Highway 70 Canoe Access entrance. You will need to have two cars because you won't start and end at the same entrance. This is why you go with multiple friends! JK, you go with friends because it's fun, but it also helps with the transportation part of the trip.

So for this trip you will take both cars to this parking lot (Highway 70 Canoe Access) and unload all the stuff you will be taking with you on your float trip. This usually includes your float, a water bottle, and a waterproof bag. We always fill our tubes with air in the parking lot and deflate them when they go back in the car. They take up a lot of space if you do it before you arrive. So an air pump that plugs into your car is a great thing to have!
Once everyone is ready to go float, the two drivers will need to take both cars to the Gossett Tract parking lot. Leave one of the cars in the parking lot and then both drivers take the other car back to the original parking lot.

Then head down to get into the water. You'll walk down this ramp to the right of the bridge and there will be stairs down into the water.

Hop in your float and let the water float you down the river! You will be floating away from the bridge.

Now how do you know if it's a good time to go floating? You'll have to check the water levels on this website. Scroll down to the "gage height". Anything between 1.5 and 3 is a good time to go. If it's under 1.5 the river will basically not be flowing and you'll be in for a very long trip. You may even have to walk part of it because it's too low. We went a few weeks ago at 1.5 and it was great! The whole trip was about 1.5 hours long, and we didn't have to walk. I did get stuck on some rocks in one section, but I was able to push off that area very easily. We went on a float trip this weekend and it was at 2 and the we were moving way faster, but somehow the trip ended up being about 1 hour 40 minutes long.

How do you know when to get out of the water? You just look for the sign that says "Kid Trip Exit". There's a little rapid right before this section and it shoots you right to the edge, so it's not hard to get out at all. The rocks gradually go into the water and create a sort of staircase, so it's pretty easy to get out! You walk up the stairs to the left and you're in the parking lot where you left the second car!

We usually leave all of our towels in this car so we can all start drying off while the two drivers take this car and go grab the car from the other parking lot. Then your float experience is over.

There are a couple more options for floating longer.... You could start your float at the same place where you just ended and then get out at The Narrows of the Harpeth. We've never done this float, but I believe it's about the same distance as the first float. You could add them together or just do one or the other. There are many options!

And you can also start at the Narrows parking lot to do a significantly longer float. If you only have one car, this is a great option, although you have to really commit to floating as it could take anywhere from 4-8 hours to complete the loop. The benefit is that when you get out, there's a little hike through the woods that takes you right back to the same parking lot you started in. So two cars are not needed.

If you decide to add the first two floats together or do the Narrows loop float, you will want to bring provisions. A floating cooler is a great option to keep the drinks cold on a hot day! Which I'm assuming it will be, because that's why we are all floating anyway right? Because it's so hot out!

One last thing to note is that the park does actually close and you can't be in the water past 7 PM. So make sure you check the water and plan your float accordingly. They usually don't let people start floating the big Narrows loop past 1 PM.

I hope this post answered some questions for you and that you now know how to do a float on the Harpeth River! It's seriously one of the things we most look forward to in the summer, so we hope you all come to enjoy it as well!

How To Clean Your Stock Tank Pool Water

So you've DIYed your stock tank pool and enjoyed using it a couple times, and then all of sudden it starts to get a green tint. Don't fret! This can be fixed! And you don't have to drain your pool....

Our pool water has looked like this at least once a month since it's been warmer outside. But the water in our pool is the same water we filled our pool up with when we made it into a hot tub in the winter. Today we will tell you everything you need to know to keep your water looking fresh, crystal clear, and blue!

First of all, your pool water should never be green, or even have a hint of green. If you see green, something isn't right with your water. At it's best, your pool water should be a pretty pale blue color and it should be crystal clear. But also remember that when you swim in the pool, your body oils and sunscreen get into the pool, so it's going to need some maintenance.

You'll want to keep a few supplies on hand to keep your water in tip top shape.
(These are affiliate links.)

A skimming net
Water Test Kit
pH minus and/or pH raiser
Broom
Chlorine Tablets
Chlorine Dispenser
New Filters

Step 1. Test the water. Follow the directions on your kit, but it usually involves filling the tubes with water, adding drop, and waiting to see what the color of your water means.

Step 2. Balance the water. If your pH is too high or too low, you will need to use pH minus or pH raiser to fix that. I've only ever had to use pH minus, and I probably only have to do that twice a season. If the pH isn't right, the chlorine cannot be used properly! So make sure to use the chemicals when you need them, and follow the instructions on the bottle.

Step 3. Add chlorine. If your test reads that you need chlorine, you need to add some tablets. If your pool is really green or cloudy, you make want to look into getting some pool shock, or liquid chlorine to add to your pool. I have found that this is necessary

Step 4. Remove all debris. Including over the drain. Take your skimming net and catch everything that is floating in the water and empty it outside of the pool. Also use your hand to grab and remove anything that is stuck in the drain grate.

Step 5. Replace dirty filter. This is pretty self explanatory, just make sure you turn the plunger valves to the lock position before you open the pump and open them before you turn the pump on.

Step 6. Run the pump. If the pool is a normal dirty, I'll just keep the pool running on the 4 hour time cycle. If it need a little more love, I'll turn it up to 6 hours.

Step 7. Sweep. And don't forget about the sides! Sweep every surface that is in the water. If your pool is green, you will see green bits moving around in the water as you sweep. Just make sure you push all of that over towards the drain outlet. If your pool isn't painted on the inside like ours is, the bottom of your pool will get slimy when green. And it will be harder to see on the shiny silver of the stock tank pool. Since our pool is white, I can see the moment algae starts to develop, and it doesn't get slimy.

Step 8. Wait for the pump to do it's job! The pump is a magical thing. And it will clean your water beautifully if you've prepped your water like we've just talked about.



If you follow all of these steps, you will have clean water in one or two pump cycles (depending on how dirty your water was). I've been able to turn around some pretty dirty water in our pool by doing these things. But you always follow the steps above even if you pool isn't green. I could probably remove debris from the pool every other day, but I end up doing it about once a week. The faster you remove the debris out of the pool, the less the filter gets filled up.

We are working on a new stock tank pool FAQs post so I'm curious.... what questions do you have? Leave them in the comments below so we can make sure we answer them.

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Happy swimming!